Fledglinks

Posted by ardeidae on September 19, 2005

  • Royal Society study shows that Plain-tailed Wrens (Thryothorus euophrys) sing complex synchronized choruses. The song is in ABCDABCD pattern, lasting up to two minutes. Males sing the A and C parts while the females sing B and D. The birds hit their part right on cue, making the song sound like it's coming from one bird. Listen for yourself (MP3).
  • Although facing extinction, the Houbara Bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) continues to be hunted in Iran. The hunt of any endangered species is prohibited by law, but high-ranking officials and Arab royalty are being exempted. The population of the Houbara Bustard has declined about 35% over three generations, due largely to hunting.
  • H5N1 bird flu virus running rampant at the Ragunan Zoo in Jakarta, Indonesia. 19 of 27 samples taken tested positive for the virus, including pygmy chickens and eagles. Two zoo workers appear to be infected as well. The zoo is being closed to the public for three weeks.
  • Bahraich, India police seize 2,000 birds that were trapped in the Kartaniya Ghat Sanctuary. The arrested men confessed the birds were to be taken to Nepal for consumption in restaurants.
  • Skye, a Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) born atop the Kodak building in Rochester, New York, found dead in Canada. A webcam showed the young falcon from when its egg was first laid to when it fledged.
  • EU approves €69 million in funding for 54 nature conservation projects across 20 Member States as part of the LIFE Nature programme. This brings the total contributions to €125.7 million.
  • Thailand man confesses to shooting and killing endangered Greater Adjutant stork. It was the first one spotted in Thailand in 40 years. He claims he only wanted to injure the bird so he could nurse it back to health and keep it as a pet. He faces up to four years in jail and a fine of 40,000 baht (about $975).
  • Minnesota Department of Natural Resources looking for clues to the mysterious death of fifty songbirds at Lake Superior. They doubt disease or poison, and are suspecting a weather phenomenon. The birds were Swainson's Thrushes (Catharus ustulatus), White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) and warblers.
  • Manitoba, Canada teen helps stranded baby Bald Eagle. He took it home and fed it fish. The eagle ended up becoming too tame to leave in the wild.

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