Below is a list of podcasts relating to birds, conservation, and nature in general. The list is updated on a regular basis, so check back often for new programs and feeds. If you find a feed we should add, if a program is unavailable, or if you discover a program that should be removed, please send an email with the details.

The podcasts listed on this site are not currently produced by or hosted by Beakspeak. They are property of their authors and don't necessarily reflect our views. If you like a particular podcast, please visit their site and show support. Without them, none of this would be possible. Enjoy!

Podcast titles and descriptions are written by their authors. Minor editing may have been done to clean up the format.

• BirdNote Podcast RSS Feed • Birdwatch Radio
• GLRC: Environment Report • Laura Erickson's For the Birds Podcast
• Naturesound, Digital recordings of Birds • NPR: Environment
• On The Wing • Parrot Science
• Rainforestinn.com's Podcasts • Ray Brown's Talkin' Birds
• RSPB Bird Notes • SciQ: Science Revealed Podcasts
• This Birding Life • Whooper Happenings
BirdNote Podcast RSS Feed


12/01/2009

In a recent episode, when we described the V-formation of large migrating birds, we made a mistake in calling it "slipstreaming". An astute listener pointed out that each bird behind the leader is actually taking advantage of the updraft of a corkscrew of air coming off the wingtips of the bird in front. This corkscrew of air is called a tip vortex. Learn more about Canada Geese at Cornell's AllAboutBirds. (1532KB)

11/30/2009

Crows didn't get where they are today by being shy or slow. They take advantage of whatever food they find, where and when they find it. Listener Jerry Campbell told his story of one crow making off with three chips. Catch a video of another clever crow in Japan. Sign up for the BirdNote podcast, and listen to BirdNote any time, night or day. (1583KB)

11/29/2009

DNA tells us the Hawaiian honeycreepers' closest relatives are birds like our backyard House Finches and goldfinches. Millions of years ago, such finches reached Hawaii, where they evolved into one of the most diversified sets of birds on earth, particularly when it comes to the shape of their bills. The Hawaiian honeycreepers include this scarlet I'iwi, whose long, slender, curved bill probes deep into blossoms. Learn more from the Smithsonian. (1586KB)

11/28/2009

The Northern Shrike breeds in the tundra and taiga of the north, but migrates south into the lower 48 for the winter. It has a pleasing and rhythmical song, which it sings even in winter. But its song belies a rather bloodthirsty feeding habit. The shrike impales its prey on sharp thorns or barbed wire, where it can pull it apart and consume it. To learn more about this songbird-raptor, visit Cornell's AllAboutBirds. (1526KB)

11/27/2009

On Thanksgiving Day, if you passed the gravy and giblets, you held in your hands the turkey's heart, liver, and gizzard. What is a gizzard? A bird's stomach is divided into two parts. The first part is a lot like our stomach. But the second part is the gizzard. Birds that eat seeds have a gizzard with tough, thick, muscular walls. Such birds swallow grit, like sand or gravel, which travels to the gizzard, where it helps grind up the seeds. (1556KB)

11/26/2009

In the early 1800s, John James Audubon wrote: "The great size and beauty of the Wild Turkey, its value as a delicate and highly prized article of food... render it one of the most interesting of the birds indigenous to the United States of America." Read Audubon's description of how Wild Turkeys, which walk more than they fly, cross a river. Happy Thanksgiving from the BirdNote team! (1550KB)

Birdwatch Radio
Birdwatching may be one of the most common activities in America. Active pursuit of birds, keeping a record of what you see, feeding the birds, and bird photography all continue to grow in popularity as well. There is a vibrant birding industry, too. This includes retail stores selling bird seed and bird supplies, more new specialized optics for those who want to view, photograph, and document their sightings, a growing number of field guides and magazines, and more than a few travel and guide services for birders who want to make their vacations more than just a day at the beach or a snooze in the hammock. Steve Moore and Birdwatch Radio bring you interesting interviews and conversations with people who represent all the areas just mentioned. We'll be talking with authors, artists, columnists, bloggers, professionals and back-yard birders...all of whom have a story to tell and a passion to share.

04/17/2009

Episode 20 - Four guests, no waiting ... on this edition of Birdwatch Radio!

This concludes our interviews from the 2009 Space Coast Birding Festival as we talk with one of the country's most well known birders and authors, Pete Dunne. Speaking of notables, we'll also chat a bit with preeminent bird photographer, Arthur Morris.

A mutual friend at the festival introduced me to Floyd Scholz, who is not only recognized as one the world's best bird carvers (specializing in raptors) but who is also a passionate birder and lover of the blues. How can you not like a guy like that?

And we conclude with Lydia Thompson, who tells us a bit about the beautiful Georgia coast and the great birding available there. As an adopted Georgian myself, I concur.

Steve (13697KB)

03/18/2009

Episode 19 - On this edition of the program we go to the movies. I know, I know, on the last program I promised you more interviews from the Space Coast Birding Festival, but that will happen next time. Promise.

Instead, we're going to give you a behind-the-scenes look at a movie that's having its world premier this month (March 2009)! Ghost Bird is a documentary about the on-going search for the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker in and around Brinkley, Arkansas. Ghost Bird was written and produced by our guest, Scott Crocker, with music written and performed by cellist Zo Keating.

It's almost spring and it's said that hope springs eternal. But even if we don't get another glimpse of the Ivory-Bill, I think you will enjoy this film and conversation.

Remember, send your thoughts, sightings and suggestions to Steve@BirdwatchRadio.com.

Happy Birding! (8658KB)

02/27/2009

Episode 18 - This time we head out to the Space Coast Birding Festival in Titusville, FL, for part one of our two-part coverage of this great event. Despite the weather, which was other than sunny and warm, I got in some great birding, and washed it down with some tasty seafood.

While there, I had a chance to chat with Ben Lizdas from Eagle Optics, Stephen Ingraham from Zeiss, Mary Guthrie from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and James Currie, host of the new Birding Adventures TV program.

We also open the mailbag and share some listener comments and suggestions. Yours are welcome, too! Send your thoughts, sightings and suggestions on how to rid my house of an uninvited home maintenance specialist to Steve@BirdwatchRadio.com.

Happy Birding! (10627KB)

02/07/2009

Episode 17 - The Birdwatch America Backyard Nature Products Trade Show is our destination on this edition of the program. We'll stroll through the isles and talk with a number of vendors about some new and interesting products for back yard birders and field birders alike.

We'll talk about Bird ID, Bird feeding, and Bird Rehabilitation -- even what's involved in publishing a Birding magazine. Altogether, seven different guests step up to the mic including Amy Hooper, editor of Wild Bird magazine, and Denese VanDyne from birdJam.
As always, we love hearing from you! Send your thoughts, sightings and suggestions to Steve@BirdwatchRadio.com. (13494KB)

01/10/2009

Episode 16 - Birding is for EVERYONE! But if thats the case, why are there so few minorities involved in bird watching? That question is examined by John C. Robinson in his new book and on todays program.

An aspect of Birding that is exploding is Blogging. And not just birding blogs, but nature blogs in general. Mike Bergin from the 10,000 Birds blog and the Nature Blog Network joins us along with the always vivacious and knowledgeable, Sharon Stiteler from Birdchick.com

Its a little longer program than normal, but full of great information and a few laughs along the way.

Our underwriting friends on this podcast include The Space Coast Birding and Wildlife Festival in Titusville, FL and The Celebration of Whooping Cranes Festival in Aransas, TX. As always, thank you for listening and telling your friends about the program. And remember, we want to hear from you! Send your comments and suggestions to Steve@BirdwatchRadio.com. (16625KB)

12/24/2008

Episode 15 - Tis' the Season.and so we get the inside scoop on Audubon's Christmas Bird Count from the guy who has been running this event since 1987, Geoff LeBaron.

Our second conversation is with erstwhile long-line fishing boat captain, restaurateur and the founder of the Space Coast Bird and Wildlife Festival, Laurilee Thompson. Her recipe for pelagic trip sea-sickness is not to be missed. Nor is the Space Coast Festival in Titusville, FL.

Finally, we present a seasonal musical interlude of ornithological interest Mike Bergin of 10,000 Birds.com reviews 'The Twelve Days of Christmas.' And drat, now I'll have it stuck in my head all day!

Thanks for joining us for Birdwatch Radio. Please tell a friend about us and consider subscribing so you don't miss a program. Click the RSS link for information or subscribe through Itunes or similar. After all, some of you got an Ipod for Christmas, right? (13488KB)

GLRC: Environment Report
A weekly update of environmental news and in-depth reports from around North America.
Updates: Mondays at 11:15am ET
Duration: approx 25 minutes

12/01/2009

Fish are swimming in hormones. Tanya Ott talks with a fish biologist about what stuff like estrogen in the water is doing to fish. And... we all hear about polar bears and penguins that are affected by climate change. But Lester talks with the National Wildlife Federation about the group's concern over the nation's fish and game species. (2003KB)

11/30/2009

Killer bees on the move. Mark Brush looks at the difference between honeybees and killer bees, and if the nickname is deserved. And... breaking the law with bees. Samara Freemark talks with a beekeeper in Brooklyn who's keeping hives... even though it's against city health codes. We take a look at illegal beekeeping in the Big Apple. (2003KB)

11/27/2009

Flushing out unwanted stowaways. David Sommerstein reports on invasive species that hide in ships. A new "swish and spit" law seems to be working. And... scavengers are in dire straights. Contaminated carcasses are killing off vultures and other buzzards. Ann Murray looks at how some people are trying to save nature's clean-up crew. (2003KB)

11/26/2009

Taking the Colonel's drive-thru to another level. Shawn Allee looks into mobile slaughterhouses for chickens. And... helping a feisty little animal go home. Barbara Jean Johnson heads out with researchers to bring a weasel- like critter back to Wisconsin. We'll find out what this animal... skunks... and Chanel No.5 have in common. (2004KB)

11/25/2009

A little help when you're out shopping. Samara Freemark has the scoop on a website - and cell phone app - that help you purchase safer products. And... there's no place like home for the holidays. And with Thanksgiving coming up, some families are trying to make it a healthier one. Julie Grant chats with one family who's trying to decide - healthy or hearty this year. (2003KB)

04/17/2009

Small cars were hot when gas was more expensive. Lately, nothing's selling. Some people think a higher gasoline tax would be a good way to get small cars moving off the lot again. Samara Freemark reports even auto dealers and automakers are lining up behind the idea of a hike in the federal gas tax. And... Lester takes a look at whether a gas tax would really fly... and how some people think government regulations and tax incentives are a better way to get more fuel efficient cars on the road. (1907KB)

Laura Erickson's For the Birds Podcast
Promoting the love, understanding, and protection of birds. Produced for KUMD, KAXE, KSRQ, KVSC, WOJB, WXPR, and WRFA-LP.

08/11/2008

This week Laura honors Roger Tory Peterson: the centennial of his birth is this month. (3456KB)

04/25/2008

A lovely essay about a woman's mother's favorite birds. (3456KB)

04/24/2008

New book introduces kids to birding. (3456KB)

04/23/2008

Laura has a pleasing new backyard bird. (3456KB)

04/22/2008

Making the right houses for lovely birds. (3456KB)

04/21/2008

Worms and mud are a robin's mainstay. (3456KB)

Naturesound, Digital recordings of Birds
Birds and animals recorded from www.naturesound.org.

10/01/2009

The cayman islands are the "British" West Indies. This podcast is without narration this time. Taken from Little Cayman, this soundscape was in the middle of a tropical thunderstorm. The microphones were left on a coral beach. The waves crash onto the beach and thunder crashes in the background. You may hear West Indian Whistling ducks fly past the microphones towards the end. Little Cayman is a recordists dream, very few people inhabit the island. Recorded with Sound Devices 788t and 2 sets of MKH 40/30 microphones recorded in an MS pattern. Recordist Martyn Stewart (18188KB)

11/08/2008

Today we are taking you to Queensland, Australia to a rainforest. we are at the chambers wildlife area at Lake Echam in the Atherton Tablelands.

I'm going to introduce you to a pademelon, NO it's not an irish fruit but a small forest kangaroo. Pademelens browse on the grass in rainforest clearings usually in groups. Pademelons are mainly nocturnal so it's a delight to be able to witness these amazing animals in an open area close to one of the main lodges that John Chambers provides. Why are animals nocturnal? Well why not! We as mammals mainly function by day because as top predators, we have very little to hide from but most Australian mammals are potential meals for something else so it is to their advantage that mammals like Pademelons function under the cover of darkness when many predator birds and reptiles are asleep.

Many thanks to Roo Stewart for the questions.

To go to John chambers site visit http://rainforest-australia.com/ (18207KB)

09/09/2008

Why Do We Fear Bears? Attacks are rare and excessive warnings about them create unnecessary fear. Balanced and factual information about bears is hard to find. (6807KB)

08/10/2008

All gods creatures have a place in the choir, including the world WE live in. (11472KB)

12/18/2007

It is December and Today I'm taking you to the Skagit flats, about 60 miles north of Seattle in Washington state. The Skagit flats is one of Americas best winter birding destinations and one of the American Birding Association's Important Birding Areas. (6899KB)

12/05/2007

It's time for another podcast from naturesound but this time we are switching species.

Most of my recordings are of birds, mainly because they are the most visual and vocal but one particular species is usually found in most of my recordings, Insects....

Insects (Class Insecta) are a major group of arthropods and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth, with over a million described species more than double the number of all other living organisms combined.

[1] Insects may be found in nearly all environments on the planet, although only a small number of species occur in the oceans where crustaceans tend to predominate instead.

There are approximately 5,000 dragonfly species, 2,000 praying mantis, 20,000 grasshopper, 170,000 butterfly and moth, 120,000 fly, 82,000 true bug, 360,000 beetle, and 110,000 bee, wasp and ant species described to date.

Estimates of the total number of current species, including those not yet known to science, range from two million to fifty million, with newer studies favouring a lower figure of about six to ten million.

Insects usually get a raw deal from most people because, well, they are insects. In fact if you stand around your local âdo it yourself storeâ you will find people buying all kinds of chemicals to eradicate them.

But what would we do without them! I for one hate the feel of mosquitos biting the living daylights out of me and I suffer badly from the after effects but I would rather have them than not. (17075KB)

NPR: Environment
Environmental science and reporting on issues from Morning Edition, All Things Considered and other award-winning NPR programs.
Updates: Thursdays at 11:45pm ET
Duration: approx 30 minutes

11/26/2009

Stories: 1) Berry Bad: Threat To Trees Lurks On Holiday Tables 2) Fungus Provides Clues To North American Extinctions 3) Financial Crisis Is 'Green' For The Environment 4) Obscured By War, Water Crisis Looms In Yemen 5) Scientist: 'Don't Give Up' On Stopping Asian Carp 6) In Oregon, Boat Owner Worries Over Climate Change (9782KB)

11/19/2009

Stories: 1) The Dirt On Dust 2) Lower Tuna Limit Still Too High, Researchers Say 3) Environment Or Economy? Obama's Balancing Act 4) Reef Conservation Strategy Backfires 5) Higher Temperatures May Be Behind Pine Growth (9654KB)

11/12/2009

Stories: 1) Gore Urges Obama To Take Lead On Climate Change 2) Researchers Get Dirty To Clean Up Chesapeake 3) New Ocean May Be Forming In The Desert 4) Climate Rift Grows Between U.S., Poor Nations 5) EPA Drafts Chesapeake Bay Cleanup Strategy (11115KB)

11/05/2009

Stories: 1) Why Leaves Really Fall Off Trees 2) NASA Launches Mission To Track Polar Ice By Plane 3) For Foer, Meat Is Murder ... And Worse 4) Lions In Famed Killings Get Partial Reprieve 5) Health Issues Follow Natural Gas Drilling In Texas 6) The Perils Of Overfishing, Part 2 (16899KB)

10/30/2009

Stories: 1) Bioengineered Plants Gone Wild 2) Scientists: Biofuel Laws May Harm Environment 3) Using Trees To Curb Climate Change Not So Simple 4) For NFL, L.A. Considers Trading Environment For Jobs 5) Demonstrating What 350 Means To Climate Change 6) U.S. Envoy: No Bilateral Climate Deal With China (12835KB)

10/23/2009

Stories: 1) 1800s-Era Sea Logs Chart Course Of Climate Change 2) Future Unlikely For Kyoto Climate Treaty 3) Endangered Sea Turtles Return To Mexico's Beaches 4) Chamber Of Commerce In Climate Change Hoax 5) A Bird In Hand To Save Those In The Bush 6) Innovative 'Times' Reporter Draws Limbaugh's Ire (13758KB)

On The Wing
Audio Magazine of Birds and Birding

08/15/2008

The story of the creation of the new Seward Park Environmental & Audubon Center in Seattle, from planning through groundbreaking, construction, and grand opening. (37604KB)

05/06/2008

Welcome to On The Wing for May 2008. (350KB)

05/06/2008

From Kate's garden in Birmingham UK. (5886KB)

05/06/2008

Events Calendar for May 2008.
Presque Isle Audubon Society
Leavenworth Spring Bird Fest
2008 Washington Island Birding Festival (2030KB)

05/06/2008

Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge is in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Park Ranger Mike Carlo is our guide.
Santa Ana NWR
City of Alamo Santa Ana NWR
Laguna Atascosa NWR
(32066KB)

09/28/2007

From Kate's garden in Birmingham UK. (4184KB)

Parrot Science
Parrots are complex creatures. This podcast will feature parrot news, behaviour information, news about wild parrots and other ways to get along with your pet parrot more effectively. Whether or not you are a bird owner with some questions, a breeder, or involved in conservation, there is something for everyone. From ParrotScience.com

12/08/2007

US Fish and Wildlife Services is only able to catch a fraction of the parrots smuggled across the US-Mexico border every year. Take a fascinating glimpse into the process of parrot smuggling and learn about the impact it has on the ecology of our world. (16141KB)

12/08/2007

US Fish and Wildlife Services is only able to catch a fraction of the parrots smuggled across the US-Mexico border every year. Take a fascinating glimpse into the process of parrot smuggling and learn about the impact it has on the ecology of our world. (16141KB)

02/15/2007

The amazing tale about the heaviest parrot in the world. The flightless kakapo can weigh up to 9 pounds. This nocturnal bird is classified as critically endangered, with all known members of the species surviving on remote islands off the coast of New Zealand. Conservation efforts began for this bird early - in the 1890s and various attempts to keep this unusual parrot alive have met with mixed success. With the introduction of the Kakapo Recovery plan, this unique island parrot may been on the road to recovery. In a land with no native mammals (except for bats), it appears as though the Kakapo has adapted to fill the niches that mammals occupy.

This is a great episode for those with displays on their iPod or watching it on the computer. ***Plenty of photos and live web links embedded as you go along! If you want more information, click on the photo when listening***

This episode features Paul Jansen of the Kakapo Recovery Programme in New Zealand, sponsored by Comalco.

Listener comments are welcome to our 24 phone message line at +1 718 395 2283

Special thanks to Stephen Fry www.stephenfry.com for his voicework in this episode.

Photos courtesy of the New Zealand Department of Conservation. (29750KB)

02/15/2007

The amazing tale about the heaviest parrot in the world. The flightless kakapo can weigh up to 9 pounds. This nocturnal bird is classified as critically endangered, with all known members of the species surviving on remote islands off the coast of New Zealand. Conservation efforts began for this bird early - in the 1890s and various attempts to keep this unusual parrot alive have met with mixed success. With the introduction of the Kakapo Recovery plan, this unique island parrot may been on the road to recovery. In a land with no native mammals (except for bats), it appears as though the Kakapo has adapted to fill the niches that mammals occupy.

This is a great episode for those with displays on their iPod or watching it on the computer. ***Plenty of photos and live web links embedded as you go along! If you want more information, click on the photo when listening***

This episode features Paul Jansen of the Kakapo Recovery Programme in New Zealand, sponsored by Comalco.

Listener comments are welcome to our 24 phone message line at +1 718 395 2283

Special thanks to Stephen Fry www.stephenfry.com for his voicework in this episode.

Photos courtesy of the New Zealand Department of Conservation. (29750KB)

02/15/2007

The amazing tale about the heaviest parrot in the world. The flightless kakapo can weigh up to 9 pounds. This nocturnal bird is classified as critically endangered, with all known members of the species surviving on remote islands off the coast of New Zealand. Conservation efforts began for this bird early - in the 1890s and various attempts to keep this unusual parrot alive have met with mixed success. With the introduction of the Kakapo Recovery plan, this unique island parrot may been on the road to recovery. In a land with no native mammals (except for bats), it appears as though the Kakapo has adapted to fill the niches that mammals occupy.This is a great episode for those with displays on their iPod or watching it on the computer. ***Plenty of photos and live web links embedded as you go along! If you want more information, click on the photo when listening***This episode features Paul Jansen of the Kakapo Recovery Programme in New Zealand, sponsored by Comalco. Listener comments are welcome to our 24 phone message line at +1 718 395 2283Special thanks to Stephen Fry www.stephenfry.com for his voicework in this episode.Photos courtesy of the New Zealand Department of Conservation (29750KB)

12/27/2006

What do you do if you become too sick to care for your bird? What about if you move to another country and can't take your bird? What if your bird became too agressive to manage? What happens if you need to part with your pet parrot? That's the topic of this week's ParrotScience.com Podcast featuring an interview with Julie Weiss-Murad of the Gabriel Foundation out of Denver, Colorado, USA. As more and more people become interesting in owning a pet parrot, more and more people have to get rid of their pet parrot. Where do they all go? How do you know if you are giving your bird to a reputable place? The Gabriel Foundation, a registered charity has been around for over a decade and strives to provide more opportunities for pet parrots. (23753KB)

Rainforestinn.com's Podcasts
Hear the sounds of the El Yunque Rainforest of Puerto Rico.

09/30/2006

For Laurie's birthday we go to the other end of Puerto Rico, the west end, to stay at the Tres Sirenas Ocean Front Inn in Rincon. We had a relaxing weekend, every evening we soaked in the jacuzzi while listening to the crash of the surf on the beach. Every morning we had a gourmet breakfast served to us on the porch in front of our room. Harry & Lisa, the owners, told us all about their Bed and Breakfast and the renovations they went through getting it ready and the Caribean decor. Harry took us on a ride all over Rincon to see the other b&b's in the area as well as restaurants, night life and surf spots. (32399KB)

08/21/2006

Bill and Laurie of the rainforestinn.com go to Hacienda Carabali and interview Alejandro Diaz Carlo. We find out about the many adventurous you can have on their six hundred acre ranch. There are guided horseback rides on Puerto Rican Paso Fino horses as well as mountain biking and four track rides. He tells us about the history of Hacienda Carabali which his grandfather founded more than forty years ago. He recommends the best days and times to come riding. He also offers special private rides for equestrians.Bamboo lounge at Hacienda Carabali http://www.cocoriopr.com/bamboo/ (14081KB)

05/22/2006

We interview Alan Mowbray at the El Portal visiter center in the Caribbean National Forest. He has written several books about the El Yunque rainforest of Puerto Rico, including "El Portal Rain Forest Center Interpretive Site Guide" which is his latest. The website for the center is http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/caribbean/Please email Bill & Laurie bill@rainforestinn.com to make comments about this podcast. We want your feedback! (32493KB)

03/31/2006

Laurie and I play selections from a jam session we had during the holidays. http://www.rainforestinn.com Please put a pin in our map http://www.frappr.com/rainforestinn or see a video of this http://www.youtube.com/user/rainforestinn Steve Selin and Dylan playing with a view of the El Yunque rainforest of Puerto Rico in the backgroundSteve Selin of Selin and Harris Violins was playing the violin.Shane and Dylan have some pictures and blogs here: http://www.travelpod.com/members/rainforestinn (24265KB)

03/18/2006

Laurie and I went on a day-trip to Vieques island to find out about some things to do there and places to stay. We talked to the manager of Vieques airlines, Bananas bar, restaurant and guest house as well as Blue Caribe Kayaks and Mimiâs guest house for bicycle rentals. Email bill@rainforestinn.com with any questions or check our show notes for links. (23877KB)

01/01/2006

The Luquillo Corridor is an untouched beach, home to many birds and a turtle-breeding haven that is threatened by development. The Sierra Club is helping to organize environmentalists who are interested in protecting this beautiful beach. Laurie and I bicycled there recently. We went in through a gate posted with a "no entry" sign. The dirt road we rode our mountain bikes on was for fisherman's access only. Flooding because of the high seas on the beach that day going over the estuary finally stopped us and we turned back but not before recording this podcast. (5837KB)

Ray Brown's Talkin' Birds
A show about birdwatching--in the backyard and beyond.

11/29/2009

On show #243: we hear about parakeets in the Boston Public Garden; we learn some amazing facts about Ben Franklin's choice for our national symbol; and Mike proffers some advice about presenting pumpkin seeds to your feeder birds. (9298KB)

11/22/2009

On show #242: we welcome Chris Rimmer from the Vermont Center for Ecostudies as co-host, and we learn about the biggest tern in the world. (9065KB)

11/19/2009

On show #241: we learn about the amazing behavior of a Whip-poor-will relative; we get a rare bird report from a listener in Toronto; and a lady name Phoebe provides the inspiration for our Mystery Bird contest. (9167KB)

11/08/2009

On show #240: we learn about a bird who sounds like the Pillsbury Doughboy, and we find our Mystery Bird in a prairie dog hole. (9341KB)

11/02/2009

On show #239: we learn about the bird that's the national symbol of Kazakhstan; Mike offers advice on whether to put rice in your feeders; and we begin the show with the sound of...silence. (9594KB)

10/25/2009

On show #238: we'll hear how Martha Stewart turned her backyard into a mecca for birds; Mike talks about the world's heaviest bird feeder; and Ray Charles helps us introduce our Featured Feathered Friend. (9356KB)

RSPB Bird Notes
A Magazine devoted to Birds and the Environment for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds for birds, for people, forever - Britain's largest environemental charity.

08/28/2007

News on the RSPB Podcast front - they now have a regular monthly magazine podcast presented by Jane Markham. It's called Nature's Voice and you can hear a taster of the early episodes of the series here. (116KB)

01/05/2007

A mini podcast episode this times with details of an exciting new series from the RSPB - the Big Garden Birdwatch podcast with BBC wildlife presenter Kate Humble. (840KB)

04/19/2006

Spring arrives in the UK and the birds get busy - but what does the discovery of a dead swan with the H5N1 strain of avian flu at the beginning of April mean for the rest of the season. Jane Markham talks to the RSPB's Andre Farrar to get the facts. (14446KB)

11/07/2005

Bird Flu. Jane Markham talks to the RSPB's Head of Species Conservation, Julian Hughes about the implications for Britain's wild birds. (17183KB)

11/07/2005

Jane Markham visits Otmoor in Oxfordshire with RSPB volunteers pond-dipping and reed planting with local children. Will the Bittern - one of Britain s rarest birds be seen on the moor once again? (16245KB)

SciQ: Science Revealed Podcasts
SciQ is a website and television series for kids about science. Tune into SciQ events, broadcasts, webcasts, podcasts, and vodcasts to satisfy your natural curiousity about the world around you.

04/29/2008

Preview this unique documentary series, exploring the coastlines of the world; to catch and cook food, fresh from the sea! It's a celebration of coastal communities, that will provide the viewer with an exclusive insight into fishing practices around the world. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

04/29/2008

Preview this unique documentary series, exploring the coastlines of the world; to catch and cook food, fresh from the sea! It's a celebration of coastal communities, that will provide the viewer with an exclusive insight into fishing practices around the world. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

04/24/2008

Get Season 2! Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s dream of escaping the city sprawl and all its stresses and downshifting into rural Dorset is finally realised when he arrives at River Cottage. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

04/24/2008

Get Season 2! Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's dream of escaping the city sprawl and all its stresses and downshifting into rural Dorset is finally realised when he arrives at River Cottage. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

04/16/2008

Ed's Up puts Ed Robertson of The Barenaked Ladies through rough, tough "day-in-the-life" experiences with some seriously rugged people. Robertson challenges his manhood in this jet-fuelled, adventure that takes him far from his life of international rock stardom. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

04/16/2008

Ed's Up puts Ed Robertson of The Barenaked Ladies through rough, tough "day-in-the-life" experiences with some seriously rugged people. Robertson challenges his manhood in this jet-fuelled, adventure that takes him far from his life of international rock stardom. Download the preview and purchase the videos at MoboVivo.com (4KB)

This Birding Life
This Birding Life is a podcast from the folks at Bird Watcher's Digest. And like the magazine's content, the topics covered by This Birding Life range far and wide -- from the backyard to the tropics, from bird feeding to bird chasing, from authors reading from their books to birders talking about their "spark" bird. This Birding Life is guaranteed to make you think, laugh, and want to spend more time out there with the birds. It's all about this wonderful hobby we share: watching and enjoying wild birds. Welcome to This Birding Life!

04/08/2009

Julie Zickefoose reads her controversial column, "Love and Death Among the Cranes." (7911KB)

12/12/2008

Bill Thompson, III, interviews Phoebe Linnea Thompson, his daughter and co-author on The Young Birder's Guide to Birds of Eastern North America. (15010KB)

10/09/2008

Bill Thompson, III, asks birding tour leader Bryan Bland to recount his memorable travels to India and beyond. (27592KB)

08/28/2008

Lisa White from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt reads an excerpt from All Things Reconsidered, by Roger Tory Peterson and edited by Bill Thompson, III. (8401KB)

08/11/2008

Bill Thompson, III talks with Victor Emanuel and discusses his inspiration for creating a worldwide birding and nature tour company. (10115KB)

05/07/2008

Bill Thompson, III talks with birdJam cofounders Jay Davis and Denese VanDyne about the origins and potential of birdJam. (7102KB)

Whooper Happenings
Whooper Happenings will present current information about Whooping Cranes across North America and those who work with and help to preserve and guide this highly endangered species. Actual voice-cuts and interviews with the biologists who do the work and handle the birds as well as those who fly with them (Operation Migration ultralight pilots) is offered.

04/18/2009

If you haven't been there lately, read what's happening everyday at Operation Migration's Field Journal.

Hint: one recent post is below... click this 'In The Field' link to read the rest and what is most current...

Most of the Class of 2008 is back now in Wisconsin, and others are not far behind. Date: April 17, 2009 - Entry 2Reporter:Liz CondieSubject:CLASS OF '08 JUVENILES ARRIVE
Location:Main Office

We just learned that WCEP trackers picked up the signals of 804, 814, and 818* at Necedah NWR yesterday. The three, along with 819, were the first of the Class of 2008 to depart on spring migration. They left Chassahowitzka NWR on March 24th. While going through Alabama 819 split from the group and his location is currently unknown.AND, five of the juveniles in the St. Marks cohort who began their migration March 30th also arrived late yesterday. They are: 805, 812, 828, 829 and 830*. The other two of the seven are 813* last reported in Iowa before arriving in eastern WI, and 826 who died of injuries sustained in Illinois. (19135KB)

04/09/2009

The Aransas flock, now in migration and scattered across the Midwest heading back to Canada's Wood Buffalo area, has had 2 more losses added to the 21 already reported by Tom Stehn, with the USFWS. One DAR chick, #832, was found dead near a power line just recently, and now a favorite of the bird handlers at Patuxent and OM's Beverly Paulan. The bird who greeted Beverly each time she entered the pen at St. Marks, flapping, dancing, with such a happy and contented spirit...

just playful and good with all the chicks (this per Brian and Barbara Clauss at Patuxent who have raised many Whooper chicks in recent years), died Wednesday evening after being under anesthesia. He was slated for surgery Thursday (today), but it was not to be. He had apparently been hit by a motor vehicle or struck his leg, breaking it above the hock, and also the bone above his foot was shattered. Other injuries were also possible, but capture myopathy and just the trauma of the exams stress a bird beyond what many can handle. He was found Sunday not far from a busy highway, and just laying there. First thought to be dead, the owner brought him to a vet, and then to a rehabber. He was ultimately taken to the University of Illinois' Wildlife Medical Clinic in Urbana, where vet surgeon Avery Bennett was to do surgery to attempt repair of the multiple fractures the bird suffered above his foot (leaving it virtually hanging in place) and hock.

The landowner reported that the 5 flock mates of 826 were 'waiting' and stayed with him for 3 days, but then left. The PTT-equipped bird, #813, had left the flock of 7 Whooping crane chicks and was located in Iowa a few days ago.
The pleasant disposition and spirit of this chick will long be remembered, and his playful antics. For Beverly to call him her favorite, he had to be pretty special!

On Sept. 26th '08, the first and second cohorts were combined to fly together for the first time. He dropped out, and rather than risk injury to the bird in crating him, Beverly decided to 'walk with him' back to the pen, though she said she ran ahead to make it look like she was leading. He flew the last few hundred yards to the pensite. He was just a day or two short of 10 months old.

Listen as she talks about #826 in WH #34...

This has been a tough winter for all the Whooping cranes with staggering losses in Texas and now 2 of the Class of 2008 chicks. Over half have arrived in Necedah, but the safe arrival of the remaining birds in the Eastern Flyway is what we anxiously wait to hear about.

Operation Migration photos - (l to r) #826 as a chick at Patuxent, with Beverly learning to eat Blue Crabs, and going into the wet pen. (147KB)

03/31/2009

To parody the McCartney-Lennon song, "I once had some birds, or should I say they once had me."  I'm not sure either Brooke or Beverly are singing this, but around 11:15 am, Monday 3/30, half of the Class of 2008 that wintered at St. Mark's NWR took to the air, found a thermal, and continued heading north.  Bev and Brooke were not able to track them long before losing the signal.  Three of the chicks have transmitters they can track from the satellite, but the signal could be difficult to detect from the ground as the birds can fly quite high (as high as 5000 feet) as they soar most of the time during migration.

So, the 4 chicks from Chassahowitzka should be arriving any day at Necedah, and their detection is highly anticipated as will be the arrival of the 7 chicks that just left St. Mark's.  No official word on the remaining 3 chicks at Chass, but they will likely be leaving soon if they haven't already.  Now, we wait to hear that all 14 birds have safely arrived at Necedah.

Listen as Beverly talks about watching the chicks leave Monday morning, 3/30, by clicking the arrow at the bottom.

The same morning the St. Mark's chicks flew north,  I followed a Florida Sandhill family around a bit and watched as the Mom and Dad fed each chick. This family is 4, as both chicks have survived and are now perhaps a month or more old, likely too big to be predated by local hawks and such.  They foraged and explored a wide area, and I finally left them to tend to their fluffy twins.  The chicks at this stage look so much like the Whooper chicks at the same age that they are very difficult to tell apart.  Sandhills also have local motorists to contend with, and last year several pairs on the Spacecoast were killed by local drivers.  Losing their parents at this tender age would be detrimental to these chicks, as they need them for both protection and to feed them at this stage.

While this family seemed to trust me, the Dad did approach me several times in a defensive stance, and looked at me. He either thought I was harmless or understood when I explained I knew a few of his Whooper cousins! Approaching these birds at any time is never a good idea as they become tame to human presence, and could actually inflict harm (beak or talons can be very deadly to bobcats or raccoons!) should they feel threatened. It's a good thing when others feel threatened sometimes. (531KB)

03/27/2009

The Whoopers are flying back home, and at least 4 of the 7 Class of 2008 at Chassahowitzka NWR have headed for Necedah. There have been about 30 birds arriving so far, and with a total of about 84 birds, more than half will be making the journey very soon. The International Crane Foundation's Sara Zimorski heads the winter monitoring team at Chass, and she also takes acre of the insemination of the parental pairs at the ICF.

Peggy and I visited with Operation Migration's Beverly Paulan and Brooke Pennypacker in late February. Those two work much harder than most of us do, and their love for these birds is just a little obvious! Those of you who love reading their accounts on the Operation Migration Field Journal will enjoy listening to what they have to say.

Tom Stehn is vacationing, so we chatted with Canada Wildlife Services' Brian Johns. Brian talks about the upcoming breeding season in Wood Buffalo, and the severe losses of many Whoopers this winter at Aransas and on their southward migration.

Check out the short article, "Who's the Predator? Who's the Prey?" from Tom Stehn on Journey North...

International Migratory Bird Day is Saturday, May 9th this year, and Operation Migration will again be at Disney's Animal Kingdom. (I mention that IMBD is the 16th in the podcast; scratch that... it's actually May 9th this year.)

A new batch of Whooper chicks will be coming soon, and we'll let you know how things are progressing!

Thanks for listening to Whooper Happenings #43! (12447KB)

03/07/2009

This time around I talk with Joe Duff about the migration and how he feels things went, and top cover pilots Don and Paula Lounsbury at the Dunnellon Airport flyover in January.

Coming up in the next several weeks, we'll hear what Beverly Paulan and Brooke Pennypacker said about the migration, raising the chicks, and their thoughts about the pending northern migration, which always brings bittersweet feelings from those working closest to these wonderful chicks!

Don't forget, you can post a comment or ask a question below in the new Whooper Happenings Blog. We may not know the answer, but we know who does!

Thanks for listening to Whooper Happenings #42!

Photo: a trio of chicks at St. Mark's just don't want to let Bev tuck them in for the night. They'd rather be flying, and even their costumed Mom doesn't blame them! But their exercise fun makes bedtime a chore almost every night Bev told us!
* I state that the Aransas-Wood Buffalo flock has a total near 266 birds this season in this podcast; a recent release from Tom's office now says that they believe that nearly 18 birds are dead this winter, and this would make the total number of Whooping cranes closer to 250, the second worst season since 1990. Many of these deaths are juvenile birds, but we will hopefully talk with Tom in the next podcast. Exact totals are difficult, and the birds are tough to count and evaluate, but the experience Tom and his team have does indicate a serious problem this year with drought conditions, and food-water sources, which are definitely related. (11473KB)

01/31/2009

The flyover at the Dunnellon Airport took place the morning of January 22nd, with pilot Brooke Pennypacker making a second circuit with all 7 young Whooping crane chicks much to the delight of the cold observers below. The brisk morning likely kept many away, as perhaps 200 people turned out to watch as the chicks were taken to their pensite at Halpata-Tastanaki Reserve, and then transferred the next morning to Chassahowitzka NWR.

Some comments from those who were there, including members of Mrs. Trublehorn's Class from Tampa Prep, and we also chatted with ultralight pilot Richard van Heuvelen.

So, the Journey ends for these 14 young birds. Their life in the wild as free birds has already begun, as the team at each site just watches over them providing food and water... hoping they will come back to the protection of the pensite each evening. So far, this is what they know. but what concerns the team is the dangers that lurk for these young birds such as from bobcats, raccoons, and other aggressive predators. Their lives have been sheltered so far, but they are now learning the outside world on their own. All too soon, in just a matter of weeks, they will make the trip back to Necedah on their own for the first time. This is a time filled with tension and concern not to mention worry for these birds, and until they are located in Wisconsin, they will be monitored. Those who may not choose to head to Wisconsin are also monitored, and depending on where they decide to land their movements are watched by the tracking team and then WCEP members decide if action might be necessary to bring them back into the flock.

Next time around, we'll talk with Joe Duff and also Don and Paula Lounsbury, who provide the top cover safety net that is such an important part at the beginning of each year's migration.

Thanks for listening to Whooper Happenings #41!

Both views of the 7 chicks are with pilot Brooke Pennypacker as they approached the Dunnellon Airport on 1/22/09. (8103KB)

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